#JazaShelves Campaign in Bungoma. Credit: E4A-MamaYe/Kenya 2018
#JazaShelves Campaign in Bungoma, 2018

Evidence for Action | MamaYe

Evidence for Action (E4A)-MamaYe advocates for the use of quality evidence to strengthen health systems. We support civil society and governments to translate complex health system data into simple graphic formats and make sure that the right people have the capacity to interpret and use it. This means:

  • Gaps and obstacles in the health system that prevent people from enjoying good health are identified so that different audiences act.
  • Decision-makers can use evidence to inform how they make plans and allocate resources for better health care.
  • Health budgets and the budgeting process are demystified, empowering citizens to influence how resources are allocated and spent.
  • Those in power are held to account for commitments to increase resources and improve the quality of health services across the continuum of care.

Our Expertise

Packaging Evidence

We translate complicated health system data into simple formats so that it is accessible to those who need it. This can mean packaging evidence for policy makers and planners so they can use it to make good decisions, or for communities and civil society so they can advocate for health system change.

Influencing

We use a multi-layered approach to influence decision-making. We convene government, civil society and the media to build a culture of mutual accountability. We form coalitions and ensure a coordinated approach among civil society to strengthen their collective voice.

We advocate for an increase in the quantity and quality of investments in health. And we develop the capacity of local decision-makers, at all levels, to build health systems that respond to the needs of women and girls.

Health Financing

We simplify complicated financial data to enable government and civil society to better understand how much money is going where. We build the skills of collaborators to understand, track and analyse budgets and use this evidence to demand greater transparency and increased funding.

We equip civil society to engage with the Global Financing Facility, tracking whether commitments to every woman and every child are met.

We support civil society coalitions to develop accountability scorecards for monitoring commitments, and advocating for improvements on how investments are implemented to meet reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition priorities.

Health Service Delivery Expertise

We work with health providers, using maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response systems (MPDSR) to understand why women and babies die during pregnancy and childbirth. With the evidence from each case, we work with health planners to identify and address what action is needed to prevent similar deaths happening in the future. 

We also assess the quality of reproductive health services so decision-makers and health facilities know what the gaps are and address them. We use digital platforms to ensure is easily available to support decision-making.

Results

  • In Nigeria, we successfully supported civil society to advocate for budget for family planning and midwives at the federal level, and for family planning at state level in Lagos, Bauchi State.
  • In Ethiopia, our support for the introduction of MDSR, saw maternal death became a mandatory reportable condition within Ethiopia’s Public Health Emergency Management system. By 2016, 69% of facilities in Ethiopia had implemented MDSR and 64% of facilities had an MDSR committee.
  • In Malawi, following two years of district support, 78% of informants said their decisions about health resource allocation were more influenced by MNCH evidence than they were previously. Informants included healthcare professionals and policy-makers at national, district and facility level.
  • In Tanzania, we supported Mara region to develop a regional strategy for the reduction of maternal and newborn mortality. Following this, 11 health centres were upgraded to CEmONC status and in 2014 there was a 17% increase in institutional deliveries.
Programme:

Results

Budget for family planning and midwives included at federal level, and for family planning at state level in Lagos, Nigeria

By 2016, 69% of facilities in Ethiopia had implemented MDSR and 64% of facilities had an MDSR committee.

In Malawi, healthcare professionals and policy-makers at national, district and facility level said their decisions about health resource allocation were more influenced by evidence than they were previously.

In Tanzania, we supported Mara region to develop a regional strategy for the reduction of maternal and newborn mortality.

Funded by: 

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